Questioning the Accuracy of Climate Change Data? You'd Be Surprised...

Ask any major scientific institution on Earth and they will tell you the global temperature has steadily risen over recent decades and longer based on extrapolative data. 

NASA recently completed a massive sweeping analysis of their temperature data named GISS temperature analysis dating back to 1880s.

Combined with data from the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA), NASA tallied all available data from over 6,300 weather stations, ships and data collecting buoys from all over the world.

NASA came to the conclusion that the past four years were some of the hottest ever on record.

But what of the accuracy of the data that attempted to predict these trends?

NASA found that the combination of their data and that of NOAA's predicted current temperatures down to one-twentieth of a degree Celsius. 

The measurements show in no small detail that Earth is warming in synch with our carbon emissions and follows it's output synonymously. 

As emissions rose, so did the temperature.

If they plateaued, so did the temperature.

Moving forward, and as our emissions continue to increase, we can expect a few more hottest years on record. 

This is not the only instance of comparing large datasets to understand any climate trends.

In March, NASA personnel compared the data from GISS and their Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument aboard their satellite that observes the world's oceans. 

The AIRS data is a bit different as it measures the actual surface temperature of the Earth with infrared sensors, hence the name. 

The resulting outcome of both GISS and AIRS data collected independently found that there is clearly a warming trend occurring and it is happening faster than we thought with the Arctic heating up the fastest. 

This finding again strengthens the accuracy of GISS after having compared to two separate data sets and finding incredible accuracy. 

#Space_Aus

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