Nanna X NASA: How one Granny Pushed Into The Deep Unknown

Too often we hear tales of the astronomically (pun intended) priced telescopes delivering shots of unseen and majestic pockets of the galaxy.

But what really inspires us is the little guys who push deeper into the deep unknown with nothing but a backyard telescope and a hankering to stare into the great beyond.

This tale is one of 60-year-old retired oceanographer Jean Dean of Guernsey a small island in the English Channel. Jean Dean was learning from a part-time stargazing course after becoming inspired by the darkness facilitated by the time of year and the clarity to peer into the blackness.

JD captured an unmistakably gorgeous 13-hour long exposure shot of the Rosette Nebula some 5,000 lightyears away. The nebula is a massive interstellar dust cloud named for its a gorgeous dusky red hue.

The Rosette Nebula by Jean Dean

The image is so astoundingly complex, especially considering that it was captured by an amateur in her backyard, that NASA has added it to their collection of best astrophotography images. 

Additionally, Mrs Dean was featured on NASA's 'Astronomy Picture of the Day' after being nagged by friends and family to submit it, which subsequently went off like wildfire through the internet. 

Rosette or Skull Nebula

Above is data of the Rosette Nebula from the INT Photometric H-Alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane.

 We thank Jean Dean for having the courage to submit it and giving us a little bit of inspiration to get out there and do some more amateur pushing into the deep unknown ourselves.